Maness Releases First TV & Radio Ads: “Gator” and “Tough”

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Press Contact: Jon Meadows PRESS RELEASE
504.401.5974 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
[email protected] May 8, 2014
Maness Releases First TV & Radio Ads: “Gator” and “Tough”
Madisonville, LA – Col. Rob Maness (USAF, ret.), the conservative candidate and non-politician running against Mary Landrieu for the United States Senate, released his first television commercial, “Gator” and a corresponding radio commercial, “Tough.” These commercials will air throughout the state. 

The combined ad buy is $50,000, a significant figure because some predicted that Maness would never raise that much in total.  (In fact, Maness has now raised nearly $1 million from almost 15,000 unique donors.)

 

“Gator” can be seen here: (link) and shows that Col. Maness is not afraid to take on career politicians — or alligators.

 

“Tough” can be heard here: (link). The 60-second commercial states: “Rob Maness is tough enough to take on President Obama and Harry Reid in the D.C. swamp.”

 

“Col. Maness has now visited all 64 parishes across Louisiana and met with Republicans, Democrats, and Independents who agree that neither party is representing our interests,” Campaign Manager Michael D. Byrne said.  “Consequently, the electorate is gravitating to Col. Maness, the only non-politician in the race, because they recognize that he is the real deal and truly one of us.”

 

Maness said that voters have been clear that they are tired of typical political ads from politicians who have overstayed their time in office, adding that many have even expressed embarrassment at the recent scandal surrounding the fake Senate hearing staged by Mary Landrieu in the State Capitol and used in one of her campaign ads.

 

“My team and I decided to mix it up a bit,” Maness said.  “Louisianans really are getting tired of the same old political ads flooding our TV sets and interrupting our favorite programs like Duck Dynasty, Swamp People, and — especially in the fall — Tigers and Saints football.”

 

Maness said that since this race is attracting national attention — and since so many around the country want to see a very conservative state like Louisiana elect a real conservative who will take on troublesome, liberal politicians — the alligator metaphor seemed like the perfect fit.

 

“In Louisiana, we know how important alligators are to our economy, but to the rest of the country, they can appear to be dangerous animals that lie in wait to devour whatever they can,” said Maness.  “In that way alligators are not unlike liberal politicians who are willing to destroy every last vestige of our liberties and independence.”

 

Byrne said that initial reviews from Louisianans who previewed drafts of the ad were overwhelmingly positive.  “Rob is a different kind of candidate and he wanted a different kind of ad to introduce himself to the electorate as one of us.  I think we’ve achieved that.”

 

 

TV

Script of “Gator”

 

Maness: I’m Rob Maness, and here in Louisiana, you learn to be tough.

 

One moment of weakness, and the alligators can eat you alive.

 

So when I get to Washington, I’ll stand up to the big-spenders.

 

I’ll fight to repeal Obamacare.

 

And I’ll protect our gun rights.

 

I’m Col. Rob Maness, and I approve this message because Louisiana needs a senator who will stand up to the career politicians… and the alligators.

 

 

Radio

Script of “Tough”

 

Maness: I’m Rob Maness, and here in Louisiana, you learn to be tough.

 

One moment of weakness, and the alligators can eat you alive.

 

So when I get to Washington, I’ll stand up to the big-spenders.

 

I’ll fight to repeal Obamacare.

 

And I’ll protect our gun rights.

 

Narrator: That’s right.

 

Rob Maness is exactly the kind of conservative warrior we need in the U.S. Senate to take on the career politicians.

 

Rob spent his life in the U.S. Air Force flying combat missions all over the Middle East to keep Americans safe and protect our liberties.

 

He’s tough enough to take on President Obama and Harry Reid in the D.C. swamp.

 

Maness: I’m Rob Maness and I approve this message because Louisiana needs a senator who will stand up to the career politicians… and the alligators.

 

Narrator: Rob Maness for Senate. A conservative. A vet. One of us.

 

Paid for by Friends of Colonel Rob Maness.

 

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Col. Rob Maness is the conservative candidate and only non-politician running for United States Senate in Louisiana in 2014.  Since announcing his campaign, Rob has visited all 64 parishes and put over 50,000 miles on his truck during his travels.  His message is one of prosperity, certainty, and liberty — principles that career politicians have routinely betrayed and that only a citizen-legislator can be trusted to support.

 

Col. Maness served in the Air Force for 32 years and rose from the lowest enlisted rank at age 17 to his appointment as Wing Commander and promotion to full Colonel.  He holds master’s degrees from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, the Naval War College, and the Air Command and Staff College.

 

Rob and Candy Maness have five children, two of whom are currently serving in the U.S. Armed Forces and a third who recently enlisted in the Air Force.  Col. Maness is a recipient of the Bronze Star Medal and Air Medal, and served in numerous combat operations, including Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom.  For more about Col. Maness, click here.

 

Media Contact: Jon Meadows

504.401.5974

[email protected]

 

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Jonathan Meadows earned a B.A. in Philosophy from the University of New Hampshire and an MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Oxford. He was a member of staff on the Ovide Lamontagne for New Hampshire Governor campaign in 2012. He is also co-founder and writer at rednewhampshire.wordpress.com. Follow him on twitter @JnthnMdws.
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